Daphne Cabianca: Environment and Nuclear Organization

Daphne is currently looking for a highly motivated PhD student and a Postdoc to decipher the function of nuclear architecture in response to environmental stress, particularly nutrient deprivation, using the nematode C. elegans.

PhD student position in nuclear organization regulation by the environment

We are looking for a highly motivated PhD student to join the newly established group of Dr. Daphne Cabianca, Institute of Functional Epigenetics (IFE), Helmholtz Center in Munich, Germany to decipher the function of nuclear architecture in response to environmental stress.At IFE, you will find a scientifically stimulating international environment. Supported by an excellent infrastructure, you will aim to solve fundamental questions of epigenetics, molecular and organismal biology.The spatial organization of chromatin within the nucleus is not random, rather it enables a functional compartmentalization of the genome which mirrors changes in cell identity. In our group, you will contribute to deciphering how environmental signals, particularly nutrient deprivation, affect the compartmentalization of chromatin in the context of a developing organism, namely the nematode C. elegans, and what are the implications for gene expression, organismal health and epigenetic memory of the stress. To achieve our goals, we combine high-resolution live microscopy screens and cutting-edge molecular biology techniques like RNAseq, ChIPseq, DamID and CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing.

See publication: Cabianca DS, et al. Active chromatin marks drive spatial sequestration of heterochromatin in differentiated cells. Nature 2019, May;569(7758):734-739.

For more information, check here.

Postdoctoral position in nuclear organization regulation by nutrient stress

A postdoctoral position is available in the new group led by Dr. Daphne Cabianca, Institute of Functional Epigenetics (IFE), Helmholtz Center in Munich, Germany to decipher the function of nuclear architecture in response to environmental stresses, particularly nutrient deprivation, using the nematode C. elegans. At IFE, you will find a scientifically stimulating international environment. Supported by an excellent infrastructure, you will aim to solve fundamental questions of epigenetics, molecular and organismal biology.To tackle our aims, the successful candidate will lead a project using high-resolution in vivo microscopy, DamID, ChIP, RNAseq and proximity-based proteomics, combined to classic C. elegans forward and reverse genetic tools as well as developmental and survival assays.

See publication: Cabianca DS, et al. Active chromatin marks drive spatial sequestration of heterochromatin in differentiated cells. Nature 2019, May;569(7758):734-739.

For more information, check here.